How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 4: ‘Love Me Do’ in 1962

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 4: ‘Love Me Do’ in 1962

‘I have not seen significant improvements in how we approach development and learning in an infant with a multifaceted condition’

 

Peter Limbrick writes: I hope you have seen in the first three parts of this 4-part essay that TAC is a very simple idea. It gives early childhood intervention (EC

Read more: How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 4: ‘Love Me Do’ in 1962

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 2. Using the ‘consultant model’ of teamwork

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 2. Using the ‘consultant model’ of teamwork

The consultant model becomes a natural way forward when a child’s TAC wants to reduce the load being put on the child, the family and the child’s practitioners.

 

Peter Limbrick writes: In Part 1 (TAC Bulletin issue 208), I argued that we have to sometimes move beyond our professional compartme

Read more: How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets. Part 2. Using the ‘consultant model’ of teamwork

Editorial: Is the children’s therapy you offer bogus? Almost certainly not, if you are a TAC Bulletin reader. But ‘Extravagant Promises Therapy’ is out there! How can parents be helped to avoid the dangers?

Editorial: Is the children’s therapy you offer bogus? Almost certainly not, if you are a TAC Bulletin reader. But ‘Extravagant Promises Therapy’ is out there! How can parents be helped to avoid the dangers?

Parents of babies and young children with disabilities have a lot to learn very quickly. Most are new to the mystifying ‘world of disability’ and can be vulnerable to unscrupulous practitioners and agencies who need to keep money rolling in.

There are also well-meaning practitioners who offer thei

Read more: Editorial: Is the children’s therapy you offer bogus? Almost certainly not, if you are a TAC Bulletin reader. But ‘Extravagant Promises Therapy’ is out there! How can parents be helped to avoid the dangers?

Children with disabilities and special needs really belong to their parents. Do service providers know this?

Children with disabilities and special needs really belong to their parents. Do service providers know this?

Editorial: I sometime wonder about this. I am sure many parents do too.

Two issues cause me concern about support for babies and young children:

 

The first is about asking parents how they experience the support that an agency provides for their child. The second is about involving local pare

Read more: Children with disabilities and special needs really belong to their parents. Do service providers know this?

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time & make better use of budgets. Part 3: Go where the child is. Do what the child does

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time & make better use of budgets. Part 3: Go where the child is. Do what the child does

Peter Limbrick writes: In parts 1 and 2 of this essay, I described collective competence and the consultant model within multidisciplinary and multiagency team work – the TAC approach.

When practitioners decide to join their efforts together around a child and family (remembering the parent is full

Read more: How a genuinely whole-child approach can save ECI practitioners’ time & make better use of budgets. Part 3: Go where the child is. Do what the child does

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets – with a note about practitioners’ spectacles. Part 1

How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets – with a note about practitioners’ spectacles. Part 1

Peter Limbrick writes: It is my belief and my experience that a whole-child approach to babies and young children who have a multifaceted condition is the most effective spur to development and learning

- and offers practitioners opportunities to reconfigure their workload. This can take pressure o

Read more: How a genuinely whole-child approach can save early-childhood practitioners’ time and make better use of budgets – with a note about practitioners’ spectacles. Part 1

How to apply systems thinking in support of an infant with ‘multiple disabilities’ – moving on from the old ways. Part 1

Peter Limbrick writes: First of all, when we are involved in helping a baby or young child to develop new skills and understanding, I believe the phrase ‘multiple disabilities’ has no validity – hence the single quote marks in the title. Com

Read more: How to apply systems thinking in support of an infant with ‘multiple disabilities’ – moving on from the old ways. Part 1

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